True Confessions

True confession #1: Twitter changed my life.

That may sound strange, considering the following:

  • I generally hate social media.
  • I joined that Facebook thing all you kids talk about all the time, then decided it was a waste and deleted my account.
  • When I first heard about Twitter, I thought, “Who cares what Bieber had for breakfast?!”
  • I didn’t start texting until 2009. When I was 27. I know, I know! Crazy, right?
  • I like complete sentences, decent grammar, and punctuation.

But literally, Twitter changed my life.

Somewhere around the beginning of 2013, I started using Twitter to connect with other math teachers. I ended up in this crazy-wonderful community that calls itself the mathtwitterblogosphere (MTBoS, for short). I’ve always had amazing colleagues at my small school, but usually on the order or one or (if I was lucky) two other math teachers across the entire JH and HS staff.

When I hopped on Twitter, I suddenly found myself in a community of dozens (rather, hundreds) of folks who were as nerdy and weird and interested in getting better at this teaching thing as I was. I loved it. I still do.

In fact, I’m pretty well convinced that jumping into this community (whether by starting a blog, getting more active on Twitter, or both) is among the best ways to supercharge your teaching, whether we’re talking skills or passion or enjoyment.

Anyway, that’s my rambling attempt to convince you that you should consider jumping into this mix of mathy folks.

And thanks to some amazing MTBoS folks, there’s a pretty sweet guide to getting started right here:

https://exploremtbos.wordpress.com/2015/10/18/a-new-exploration/

So whether you’re brand new to the MTBoS, a dabbler who wants to dive a bit deeper, or a grizzled veteran looking to help others with their first steps, give that link a try. I promise you won’t be disappointed.

Comments 2

  1. It’s exactly the same thing for me. Twitter change my life! Now I have access to math folks from everywhere around the world. I know Dan Meyer and Micheal Fenton because of Twitter.

  2. Pingback: Time for a #slowmathchat Shift | Reason and Wonder

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